growing

Growing and Harvesting Bell Peppers

Dan Field & Row Crops, This Land of Ours

Growing and harvesting your homegrown bell peppers. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

growing
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Bell peppers need warm soil and warm temperatures to thrive. To encourage faster growth in cooler areas, consider laying black plastic over the soil. Just be careful not to let the soil get so hot that beneficial soil bacteria are killed.

For improved fruit production, keep plants evenly moist throughout the season, especially when they are in bloom and producing fruit. Between 1 and 1 1/2 inches of water each week should be sufficient. Also, bell peppers won’t product much fruit if temperatures aren’t between 70 and 90 degrees.

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When it’s time to harvest, the peppers will sweeten the longer you leave them on the plant, with increased vitamin C content as well. Make a clean cut with a knife or sharp scissors, being careful not to topple or otherwise disturb the plant which may have fruits that are still developing.

Wipe any excess dirt away with a clean, dry cloth and store in the produce crisper bin of the refrigerator for up to one week.

Listen to Cathy Isom’s This Land of Ours program here.

Growing and Harvesting Bell Peppers