storms

Storms Pile On Snowpack, Big Boost for Southern Sierras

Dan Water, Weather

storms

Snowpack totals jumped considerably after two storms rolled through California. Last Friday, February 1, snowpack sensors estimated the snow water equivalent for the state at 98 percent of the historical average and 61 percent of the historical April 1 average. Two storms passed through California since then, and those numbers are now significantly higher. As of yesterday, February 5, the statewide snow water equivalent sits at 125 percent of average and 83 percent of the April 1 average.

Those storms especially hit the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains hard as according to the sensors, the lower-third of the mountains jumped almost 40 percent and now sit at 133 percent of average and 83 percent of the April 1 average. The snow water equivalent for the northern and central third of the mountains rose to 111 and 128 percent of average, and 76 and 86 percent of the April 1 average respectively. 

These numbers are in stark contrast to last season when the state had very little rain before late spring storms in March. Sensors on February 5 of last year recorded snow water equivalents at just 26 percent of average and 17 percent of the April 1 average. Producers have their fingers crossed with almost two full months to go to add to the current numbers. Another storm is expected to hit the northern end of California with rain and snow at the end of this week. 

Storms Pile On Snowpack, Big Boost for Southern Sierras
About the Author
Taylor Hillman

Taylor Hillman

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AgNet Media Operations Manager and Farm News Director for AgNet West.