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ice damage
Yesterday Cathy Isom filled us in on things we should do if our trees have ice damage from the storm. Cathy continues her segment on winter tree care by letting us know some things we shouldn’t do if our trees are damaged by a fierce winter storm. That’s coming up on This Land of Ours.

Download Ice Damage to Trees

Broken tree branches are common after a major snow and ice storm. Some broken and injured branches can be trimmed and repaired. Others will need to be removed altogether.
ice

most commonly when you have a broken branch, its best to remove it back near the trunk and cut just outside the branch collar. We don’t want to leave much of a stub. Just a slight swelling of the branch should remain on the tree after the branch is removed.

Kansas State University Extension Forest Specialist Charles Barton says in some cases homeowner’s first instance will be to head straight to the garden store to find some type of wound treatment, pruning paint, or sealer for the damaged trees. But that’s not necessary.

We feel that we are helping put a band-aid on the tree but it doesn’t really help the tree any.

That’s because when a tree is wounded, whether by breakage in a storm or insect activity, it creates boundaries around the affected area in order to stop the spread of disease and decay, and then continues to grow. And another thing you shouldn’t do when your trees are damaged by a fierce winter storm…  hire inexperienced and unlicensed cleanup crews, which could result in further damage to trees. Because cleanup isn’t necessary immediately after the storm, its important to take your time and find someone who is an experienced arborist – preferably ISA-certified. You’ll just want to get it done before Spring growth.

I’m Cathy Isom…

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